SHO Surgical Recovery

Using Gaitkeeper to measure post surgical recovery

Sliding humeral osteotomy (SHO) is an advanced procedure that is currently offered in only a few veterinary hospitals worldwide. It involves cutting the humorus (upper arm bone) and fixing it in a new position using a special stepped bone plate and screws. This transfers weight away from the diseased medial joint to the healthier lateral joint. In young dogs, there is the potential for some cartilage regeneration in the medial compartment after SHO.

x-ray Example x-ray of a traditional SHO surgery. © Fitzpatrick referrals
Name Inca Ward
Age 1 Year 7 Months
Breed Chocolate Labrador
Sex Female
Weight 28kg
Height to withers 50cm
Notes No previous surgery

This case study tracks Inca, a young Labrador Retriever whom underwent a SHO surgery on her Left leg. Inca had her gait measured before and after the surgery using the GaitKeeper system. This case study shows how the readings can be interpreted along side traditional observation to gain an objective gait measurements for observing recovery.

Cadance
Swing
Stance
Jerk

Cadence is the measure of the number of steps per minute (steps/min)

Jerk is a quality measure of the limb movement from nal contact to initial contact; the opposite of “smoothness”. The Peak Jerk is the maximal value observed in the swing phase.

The percentage of the step time the limb is in stance (support) position.

The percentage of the step time the limb is in swing phase.

Pre Surgery

There is a symmetry between legs but a large asymmetrical variability on the right leg. This is a compensation mechanism for the left leg.

Two weeks post surgery

The variance in cadence on the right (compensating leg) drops significantly.

Six weeks post surgery

The variance in cadence of the right leg begins to stabilise but a slight asymmetry between right left remains.

Pre Surgery

The patient has slight asymmetry and lower than normal swing percent. Variability in the right and left limb is high.

Two weeks post surgery

The left limb has a very pronounced decrease in variability possibly explained by recovery. The mean value of the right leg is also elevated as it is in compensation mode (it needs to get back into support position for the operated leg).

Six weeks post surgery

Symmetry is improving and variability in the left leg is also improving as rehabilitation progresses.

Pre Surgery

There is a large variability on both legs and an asymmetry with left bias.

Two weeks post surgery

The variability in the left has decreased significantly but the right leg can be seen to compensate; it spends less time in stance.

Six weeks post surgery

Symmetry has improved in the mean stance percent. Variability in left leg has remained low and right leg has also decreased slightly.

Pre Surgery

We can observer the jerk variability in the both limbs is high (but symmetrical) compared with normals for a dog of the patients size.

Two weeks post surgery

The mean jerk in the left leg is still high but variability in right leg has decreased. Some asymmetry now observable between legs during the recovery process.

Six weeks post surgery

Symmetry between mean jerk values has improved. Variability in jerk on left and right legs has also decreased.

Week 0
Week 2
Week 6
Pre Surgery

Video shows obvious slowness in walking and the patient looking uncomfortable.

Two weeks post surgery

Visible preference to contralateral (right) limb.

Six weeks post surgery

Walking with better range of motion and symmetry on both limbs.

Testimonial
GaitKeeper results corroborated what we saw in our manual observations and agreed with our force plate symmetry analysis. What’s promising about the GaitKeeper is that it requires minimal setup and will be easier to use with some patients.
Fraje WatsonNurse at Fitzpatrick Referrals
Data for this case study was collected at Fitzpatrick Referrals hospital. For more information on Fitzpatricks procedures and services please visit their website www.fitzpatrickreferrals.co.uk